The Student News Site of Villanova University

The Villanovan

The Villanovan

The Villanovan

Behind the Scenes of Sorority Rush

The+Villanova+Inn%2C+where+the+in-person+rounds+of+sorority+recruitment+take+place.%0A
Avery Chalk/Villanovan Photography
The Villanova Inn, where the in-person rounds of sorority recruitment take place.

As one of the many girls who recently embarked on the adventure of rushing a sorority, my journey ultimately led me to accept a bid with a sorority I love. The Panhellenic Primary Recruitment process unfolds in a series of rounds: sisterhood, philanthropy and preference. The process concludes with bid day. From the highs of engaging conversations to the lows of swift rejections, stress was an ever-present companion for Potential New Members, known as PNMs.

I found that each sorority harbored genuinely nice women, defying the stereotypes that often precede them. However, the joy of each round was starkly contrasted by the disheartening manner in which results were communicated. An email would arrive a mere hour before the first bus departure of the morning, listing the sororities extending invitations to each PNM. I felt confident after many of the five-minute conversations, only to be crestfallen when some sororities didn’t call me back. The next day didn’t bring any surprises for me, but witnessing the disappointment of fellow freshmen juxtaposed with the cheers of their friends was tough. The lack of notice before the rounds didn’t allow sufficient time to process emotions, leaving a feeling of frustration for PNMs.

Cali Carss, a freshman who experienced rush, spoke to this frustration. “Every upperclassman I talked to played it down a lot, so I was a little blindsided by how stressful it was,” Carss said.

The gravity of the rush process became painfully evident during preference day as well as the night before bid day, with numerous women choosing to drop out of the entire process. The morning of bid day brought a harsh reality. Advisors known as Rho Gammas made calls to those who did not receive a bid. The heartbreaking sounds of sobbing in bathroom stalls echoed the emotional toll of rejection. It was an extremely intense moment later in the day when bid envelopes were opened, as both happiness and disappointment filled the air of Mendel Field.

An aspect that struck a chord was the absence of a break at bid day before heading to off-campus activities. I wished for a pause, because although I was thrilled where I ended up, some were upset about their placements. Even though many were content with the bid they ultimately received, it was simply upsetting to be rejected by their first choice. Regardless of the outcome, it can be a highly stressful moment.

“You don’t get any time to process a lot of the information,” freshman Megan Bolger said. “I expected it to be cutthroat, but it was still tough.”

During the rush process, despite assurances to the contrary, some sororities subtly delved into personal attributes such as looks, Instagram followers and financial status. The barrage of questions about my background, travel experiences and whether I went to a public or private school were overwhelming, highlighting the unspoken biases at play.

The impact of rejection went beyond mere disappointment, as many felt their insecurities about looks or personality reinforced. The struggle to reconcile with these feelings was a common thread among those who did not receive bids from their top choices.

Despite the challenges and the negative aspects highlighted, my rush journey had undeniably positive moments. Great conversations, the joy of dressing up with friends and the ultimate satisfaction of finding a sorority to call home are memories that shine through the more challenging aspects of the process.

“I had a very great experience,” freshman Jasmin Sabala said. “Every day I went in full of nerves, and then when I got into the room, everyone was very friendly.”

It was disheartening to learn that this year’s spots were limited due to an attempt to establish a new sorority on campus, which unfortunately fell through. Many women were excited to be the founding members, only to be let down.

I believe that everyone should rush, armed with an open mind. It’s an experience that shapes both the Greek life community and the individual, fostering growth, self-discovery and lasting connections.

“I highly recommend that everyone tries it, and if you don’t like it you can always drop,” freshman Ally Lombardo said. “But I promise you won’t regret doing it.”

I rushed at Villanova to make new connections. Despite the challenging process, my decision to accept a bid has quickly proven worthwhile. In just over a week, I’ve seen my hopes materialize, experiencing the supportive sisterhood and personal growth I sought. The Panhellenic community’s sense of unity reinforces the rewards of sorority life that outweigh the initial challenges of the rush process.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Villanovan
$2200
$2500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of The Villanovan with technological needs, training, etc!

More to Discover
Donate to The Villanovan
$2200
$2500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Villanovan Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *